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Exclusive Video: Allie Brosh and Felicia Day In Conversation

by | July 20

Allie Brosh and Felicia Day are no strangers to internet fandom—but how do they keep their ideas flowing? How do they re-inspire themselves to create day in and day out, without letting their unique flames diminish? Who are their favorite internet creators? What book would they make everyone in the world read?

In this exclusive interview for Get Lit readers’ eyes only, you can delve into the inner workings behind two of your favorite Internet stars!

Scroll through the archives of Allie’s legendary blog and check out the the creators that Felicia and Allie mention:

Vi Hart | Romantically Apocalyptic | Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder | The Complete Calvin & Hobbes by Bill Watterson | The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

 

Hyperbole and a Half

Hyperbole and a Half

by Allie Brosh

FROM ALLIE BROSH:
This is a book I wrote. Because I wrote it, I had to figure out what to put on the back cover to explain what it is. I tried to write a long, third-person summary that would imply how great the book is and also sound vaguely authoritative—like maybe someone who isn’t me wrote it—but I soon discovered that I’m not sneaky enough to pull it off convincingly. So I decided to just make a list of things that are in the book:

Pictures
Words
Stories about things that happened to me
Stories about things that happened to other people because of me
Eight billion dollars*
Stories about dogs
The secret to eternal happiness*

*These are lies. Perhaps I have underestimated my sneakiness!

You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)

You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)

by Felicia Day

When Felicia Day was a girl, all she wanted was to connect with other kids (desperately). Growing up in the Deep South, where she was “home-schooled for hippie reasons,” she looked online to find her tribe. The Internet was in its infancy and she became an early adopter at every stage of its growth—finding joy and unlikely friendships in the emerging digital world. Her relative isolation meant that she could pursue passions like gaming, calculus, and 1930’s detective novels without shame. Because she had no idea how “uncool” she really was.

But if it hadn’t been for her strange background—the awkwardness continued when she started college at sixteen, with Mom driving her to campus every day—she might never have had the naïve confidence to forge her own path. Like when she graduated as valedictorian with a math degree and then headed to Hollywood to pursue a career in acting despite having zero contacts. Or when she tired of being typecast as the crazy cat-lady secretary and decided to create her own web series before people in show business understood that online video could be more than just cats chasing laser pointers.

Felicia’s rags-to-riches rise to Internet fame launched her career as one of the most influen­tial creators in new media. Ever candid, she opens up about the rough patches along the way, recounting battles with writer’s block, a full-blown gaming addiction, severe anxiety, and depression—and how she reinvented herself when overachieving became overwhelming.

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Touchstone is a small but mighty imprint within Simon & Schuster, publishing authors like Anna Kendrick, Grace Helbig, Felicia Day, and Pusheen the Cat.